Category Archives: Travel

Lyford Cay

It has been too long and I apologize….however, I do have a juicy vacation spot for you all. My husband and I just went to Lyford Cay for the first time for a dear friend’s wedding. All my expectations were surpassed. After countless hours of ogling the redesign of the club by the uber-talented Tom Scheerer ( http://www.tomscheerer.com/content/projects/commercial.html), I finally was able to see it in the flesh and I was not disappointed. A soft sea-shell pink dominates the many rooms he redid and the effect is fantastic. The main club, rooms, cottages, and dining room are steps from a white sand beach that boasts bevy of kyacks, sailboats, and paddle boards that you can rent.

The overall feel of the club is warm and gracious. Like your chic grandmothers home it is easy to live in yet something to aspire to. Tom was able to blend the old tradition with a new forward thinking look. I assuming keeping members of all ages thrilled. It is very difficult to bring about any change in a club and he has done so with aplomb. You find chinese chippendale mixed with bamboo, rattan, wrought iron, cane, grasscloth, antiqued mirror, and loads of quadrille, and michael devine fabric.

Above: One of my all time favorite rooms

Above: A close up of the walls. They installed grasscloth and painted it a deep chocolate brown. They then painted ivory and white palm trees on top.

The result is fantastic.

Above: A shot of the Library where backgammon is played and you can escape the sun to read.

Above: The Bar done in reds and tans with leopard rug. It is cozy and timeless yet feels totally current.

Above: A close up shot of an etched bell jar lantern- one of my favorite light fixtures to use.

Above: A seating area in the lobby with large panels of antiqued mirror, a Peter Dunham fabric on the kidney shaped sofa, and a custom fig leaf ceramic ashtray.

We stayed in room 39 right on the beach and it was fantastic. I can also recommend the cottages which were terribly chic, calimg, and fresh with their quadrille wallpaper. Another favorite spot was the Yacht Club with a navy and black striped floor that picked the colors right out of the swordfish that hangs above the fireplace. Sitting outside at a table you overlook a bode court watching beautiful boats pull into their slips. Sigh…..take me back.

Above: The clubs signature drink the Rum Dum.

Totally relaxed!

xo,
S

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Get Thee to the Frick – Picasso’s Drawings, 1890-1921

On Monday night I was lucky enough to attend the opening of the Picasso exhibit at the Frick. The Frick is one of my favorite museums in New York and the exhibition was outrageously fabulous. “Picasso’s Drawings, 1890-1921: Reinventing Tradition” follows his work over three decades and with only 61 works on display it was an enjoyable and easy way to see Picasso.

Some of my favorite’s:

This one blew my mind. They had a drawing Picasso did when he was 8 or 9 years old. Hercules 1890 below:

Portrait of the Artist’s Father 1896 is below. Done only 6 years after the drawing above.  His talent grew incredibly- amazing.

Sorry about the size of the image… I loved this one in person, the colors and mixed media gave it such a wonderful feel. Portrait of Antoni Sabates 1899:

Seating nude and Standing Nude 1906 is below.

Yellow Nude 1907 below:

Still Life with Chocolate Pot below. 1909

The New York Times covered the exhibit today: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/07/arts/design/lines-that-kept-moving-and-knew-no-boundaries.html

Buy your tickets online and go see this exhibit before it is gone: http://www.frick.org/exhibitions/picasso/

xo,

S

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Nantucket Continued…


And we’re back! I went to Nantucket this past weekend with my husband and daughter to stay with friends. The weather was truly gorgeous and we had an action packed weekend. Growing up in New England, Nantucket has always been a favorite summer getaway. I could go on and on…but I won’t. I have included some photos I took this weekend of a few of my favorite spots.

Above: The view of the harbor as you fly in.

Above: We spent some time at The Westmoor Club with our friends who are members.  The landscaping and facilities are amazing.  We played croquette on the grass courts next to the grass tennis courts and ate dinner in the club house.  The Colonial Revival mansion built in 1917 for Alice Vanderbilt is now the clubhouse ( the large dining room was added on when the club was built).  The following day we went out on the club’s 77′ classic wooden boat Belle and had lunch and watched the regatta.

The Chanticleer is my absolute favorite restaurant on the island. Located in Sconset, the charming old restaurant is beautifully decorated and sits amidst beautiful gardens of wild flowers.  The food never disappoints with their modern French menu emphasizing New England and Artisan ingredients. I had the beet salad which had goat cheese and a chocolate truffle glaze. Unbelievable.  For my main course I had the swordfish with an onion ring on top.  Perfection. I cannot get back there soon enough.

The Chanticleer: 9 New Street • Sconset • Nantucket, MA • 508.257.4499

Below are photos I took while walking the bluff in Sconset.  This is a great way to see some of Nantucket’s most beautiful homes and gardens.  The walk along the bluff takes you through every waterfront home’s front yard.

I am all ready missing it!

Here are some great cocktail table books so you can bring Nantucket home with you:

Nantucket: Island Living

Buy it here: http://www.amazon.com/Nantucket-Island-Living-Leslie-Linsley/dp/1584797231/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1314203080&sr=8-1

Nantucket: Gardens and Houses:

Buy it here: http://www.amazon.com/Nantucket-Gardens-Houses-Taylor-Lewis/dp/0316523348/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1314203200&sr=8-12

xo,

S

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Nantucket

Hi all,

So sorry it has been such a long hiatus! We have been swamped with clients and haven’t had any time to post!  I am off to Nantucket for a long weekend to see friends and get some R & R.  I promise to have a juicy, ultra-fab post for you about my travels when I return!

I took the above photos during my last trip out to Nantucket.  Sconset is my favorite part of the island- so charming!

xo,

S

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Lyford Cay Club- Bahamian Beauty

I must post on the newly designed Lyford Cay Club by Tom Scheerer. Absolute perfection in chocolate browns, greens, shrimp, and pale pink! The living room is stunning.  He used grasscloth painted it chocolate brown, and then painted 20′ tall palm/ coconut-esque trees.  I am working on a project in Palm Beach and this has been a huge inspiration.  Quadrille, Peter Dunham, sisal, antiqued mirror, pickled cyprus, tented rooms….sigh.

xo,

S

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Eataly: New York City’s Italian Food Emporium

Wow… my husband and I visited to the much talked about Eataly on Saturday and LOVED it.  Best not to go in hungry as you will want to explore everything before you settle on what to eat or what to buy.  With all the tempting food bars ( Panini, Gelato, Cappucino, Meats and Cheeses, Oysters, Wine and Beer) and restaurants it is tough to make a decision.

If you haven’t heard about Eataly, let me get you up to speed.  Chef Mario Batali opened Eataly, a 50,000 square foot world of all the best food Italy has to offer in the Flatiron District of New York City.  We loved the cool minimalist design and “oohed” and “aahed” over all the meats, cheeses, pastas, breads, vegetables, and seafood.  With seven restaurants and four food stands there is something to fulfill your wildest Italian cravings.  Batali says, “This isn’t a selection of restaurants under one roof. This is a retail store where we peddle the greatest of Italian gastronomy to people who want to eat it and know how to appreciate it. You ask any Italian and all of the smart Americans where the best meal they ever had in the last ten years was, and it was never in someone’s restaurant. It was always in the house.”

The market (which also includes an on-site bookstore) opened with Batali’s longtime partners Joe and Lidia Bastianich (and Italian investor Oscar Farinetti), features a who’s who of New York and Italy’s top food personalities. Heading up the charcuterie selection are famed New York butcher Pat LaFrieda (who provides the excellent burgers found at the nearby Shake Shack) and Sergio Capaldo, founder of the Razza Piemontese Consortium, and a leader in the Italian slow food movement. Even Batali’s father, a longtime Seattle meat purveyor, is getting in on the act, flying in his famous salumi from the West Coast. Chef David Pasternack (of the beloved Midtown seafood spot Esca) is manning the fish station, while Marco Michelis, a young chef shipped in straight from Torino, will be serving up gnocchi, orecchiette, and other fresh pastas daily.  For wine lovers, the vino section will carry over 1,000 bottles.

Aside from the restaurants and the market you can also shop for cookbooks, cooking utensils, sign up for cooking classes, and plan a trip to Italy through their travel program.

Fresh vegetables… I love the brussel sprouts!

Fresh pastas being made on site.  The ravioli and gnocchi selection looked outstanding.

The imported pasta section in the market has a huge selection.  There are signs throughout the market located above each type of food telling you what to cook or pair the particular item with…very helpful.

The meats all looked amazingly fresh and again, there was a wide selection to choose from.

The seafood counter was amazing and all of the mussles, clams, and shrimp packed into ice is quite tempting.

The cheese and sliced meat selection in the market is perfect for a picnic.

The bread is all made on site ( you can watch through a glass window).  We sampled some and it was delicious.

All the Italian jams, cookies, crackers, candy, and chocolate you could want.

The dessert counter in the market caught my eye. How incredible do all of these look? Perfection.

The signs through out the Italaian mecca help you find your way around.

Above is the central “food court” where we settled on eating lunch.  There are four stations with counter space for you to grab some appetizers and a glass of wine or beer.

Our lunch hit the spot: An order of caprese followed by a selection of five meats and five cheeses paired with honey, figs, jam, and bread.  Paired with a rose wine.

I look forward to my next visit! It is a great way to spend a Saturday afternoon and definitely worth a trip into the city.  There is nothing quite like Eataly!

Below is a breakdown of exactly what Eataly has to offer:

Wine and Beer

Wine director Dan Amatuzzi worked with Batali, Bastianich and Farinetti to stock Eataly’s shelves with more than 1,000 Italian wines, including AntinoriFerrari and La Mozza. Meanwhile, beer lovers can take the elevator up to the rooftop to indulge in La Birreria‘s house brews.

The Food

Le Verdure (vegetable) will serve fried veggies, fresh salads and other vegetarian-only options.
Manzo (meat) will have a menu that features raw beef, steak and anti-pasti dishes.
Il Pesce (fish), headed up by Esca chef David Pasternack, will sell everything from lemon-cooked fish to seafood salads and contorni.
La Pizza (pizza) will dish out delicious fresh mozzarella pies made daily in wood-burning ovens.
La Pasta (pasta), La Pizza ‘s nearest neighbor, will serve dried and fresh pasta dishes, some of which you can find on the store shelves.
Salumi e Formaggi (salumi and cheese) will offer delectable cold-cuts, with favorites like prosciutto di Parma and an array of aged cheeses. At the mozzarella bar, you can watch the cheese being handmade before buying a chunk.
Crudo (raw bar) is where you can stock up on raw delights, while getting a front-row seat to the chef as he prepares dishes.

Retail

Eataly’s shelves are rife with imported Italian olive oils (prices range from $8- $40), dried pastas ($1.75-$20), balsamic vinegars, tomato sauces, honey, and jams. There’s also a selection of linens, kitchen equipment, houseware products, and a bookstore dedicated to wine, food and Italian culture. And if you’re thinking about visiting Italy, talk to AlpiTours and Liberi Tutti, the in-house travel agencies available to help you plan your next trip.

Culinary Stations and School

The stations spread throughout the store will offer food and wine courses, lectures and demonstrations. You can learn everything from how to make fresh mozzarella, to how to roll out pasta dough and bake focaccia bread. At La Scuola (the school), you can take classes with Eataly’s founders, who’ll teach you about artisanal products, seasonal ingredients, as well as healthy cooking.

xo,

S

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The Hamptons

After spending a lovely few days at a friend’s house in Bridgehampton, I am eagerly anticipating my next trip out to the Hamptons.  I have spent a lot of time in the Hamptons over the years: share homes in Westhampton and Southampton; working on projects in Amagansett, East Hampton, Watermill, and Southampton; antiquing all over; and it is still hard to pick a “favorite Hampton”.  I enjoy each town for different reasons.  My friend’s home in Bridgehampton is a beautiful original cottage with a spectacular garden, pool house, and period furniture.  Running, walking, or biking the back roads in the Hamptons is the best way to see all of the beautiful homes and landscaping.  You will see a mix of modest cottages and rambling mega-homes all perfectly situated behind privet hedges.  I have added a few of my favorite published homes as well as my favorite places to stay.  Make your way out east and see for yourself!

A cottage in Southampton designed by Timothy Whealon below:

The lucite table gives the dining room a light, airy, modern feeling.

I love painted floors and this brown and white diamond pattern works beautifully with the cabinetry.

A cottage in Southampton by Chiqui and Nena Woolworth below:

The colors and patterns in this home are right up my alley.

Cottage designed by Emma Pilkington below:

Though this room has a neutral vibe, the sofa, club chair, and drapes are all patterned fabrics.  The stair rail, lamp, cocktail table, and ikat throw pillows ground the room with their deep chocolate color.

Plum silk ikat club chairs, olive green and plum muriel brandolini fabric for the drapes, pale blue walls, teal side table, and acid yellow pillows all work well together to create an interesting yet soothing room.

Keep it simple with a few statement pieces: an otherwise simple room is dressed up with a shell chandelier and mirrored center table.

Privet hedge, pool, and bright green grass- nothing better!

Home designed by David Lawrence below:

Bold blue and white with crisp clean lines and painted white woodwork keeps this beach house camera ready.

Home designed by Markham Roberts below:

A large living room with multiple seating areas is ideal.  Family can all be together while having their own space.  This is also a great set up for entertaining.

The grasscloth on the walls and the white bead board make this entrance hall soothing and inviting.  The built-in bookcase breaks up the long hall.  They suspended it to create the feeling of a wider hall.

A traditional and cozy bedroom in cool blue and whites.

I love built-in seating and this particular spot is the perfect place to curl up and read while taking in the view.

Plan a trip and stay at one of my favorite inns:

Amagansett:

The Reform Club:

Recently opened and just written up in Town and Country this is a spot I am dying to try. A renovation of a run-down shingle-covered bed and breakfast, opened last summer in the discreet East Hampton hamlet of Amagansett, where the neighbors include Gwyneth Paltrow, Paul McCartney, and Jerry Seinfeld. The look in the seven suites and three cottages is breezy and low-key: white wood paneling, taupe sofas, linen-covered headboards, embroidered bedspreads. Each suite and cottage has different contemporary art—a headless, one-armed woman makes frequent appearances in prints and paintings—a coffee table piled high with art and history tomes, iPod dock, and, best of all, a working fireplace. Voluminous bathrooms with mosaic floors (ours had his and hers walk-in showers) and Kiehl’s products are another highlight. Unless you’re at the beach or browsing East Hampton’s pricey boutiques (be driven to either in the hotel’s SUV, or borrow a bike), you’ll be tempted to stay in your own quarters, which include a terrace in most cases. Spring for a one-bedroom cottage and have your very own house in the Hamptons.

Website:  http://reformclubinn.com/main.html

East Hampton:

1770 House East Hampton:

Located at the beginning of Main Street this Inn offers charm and delicious food all within walking distance of town center. Originally built as a home, the Inn dates back to 1663.  However, it was not until 1770 when the home was converted into an inn that it gained its name.  The inn has retained much of its original architecture and colonial charm.  The steep wooden staircase, exposed wooden beams, and book lined lounge with antique fireplace are only a few elements that make this Inn warm and inviting.  With just 6 rooms and a private carriage house ( all equipped with flat screen TVs, Frette bed linens and some with fireplaces) this small Inn has an intimate and private feeling.  The restaurant is one of my favorites in town ( along with Nick and Toni’s and Della Femina) offering up many local foods and a fabulous wine list.

Website: http://www.1770house.com/

The Hedges Inn:

Recently refreshed with a multimillion-dollar renovation ( 2008) and a fabulous location ( steps from town center) this Inn is a great pick.  Beadboard wainscoting, beachy pastel hues, antique reproduction furniture, and flat-screen TVs outfit the 12 rooms, which also have marble-clad bathrooms.  There’s no restaurant or pool, but East Hampton’s restaurants are a ten-minute walk away, and guests receive parking permits to nearby East Hampton Village Beaches (along with beach chairs and towels) as well as passes to the East Hampton Gym.

Website: http://www.thehedgesinn.com/

Mill House Inn:

This Inn is a 19th century house with iPod decks and flat screen TVs with 11 individually decorated rooms.  They do a fabulous job of mixing the old with the new, bathrooms are recently updated and 5 rooms are dog friendly.  Located a few steps from the center of town but maintaining a calm quiet this is a wonderful choice for your getaway weekend.

Website: http://www.millhouseinn.com/

xo,

S

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Newport, Rhode Island

Summer is my favorite season and that is due, in large part, to all of the summer days and nights spent in Newport, RI. The seaside town is set amidst historic buildings, cobble stone streets, and some of the nations best known ( and impeccably preserved) mansions.  You can charter a motor or sail boat to take in the spectacular coast line or hop on a bike or walk the city to get a feel for it’s charming streets.

1. Grace Kelly and Louis Armstrong on the set of High Society filmed in Newport. A must see!

2. Dinner and dancing at The Sky Bar on the top floor of The Clark Cooke House. After 11:30 pm the tables are cleared and the DJ starts spinning, finish up the evening with a rendition of “God Bless America”.  The heirloom tomato salad and lobster ravioli are my favorite dishes.  Make sure to save room for their famous “Snowball in Hell” for dessert (a chocolate brownie, with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, chocolate sauce, and shaved coconut lit on fire).

3. Surfing at Bailey’s as photographed by Slim Aarons

4. Newport to Bermuda Race June 2010

1. Grab a cocktail ( preferably a dark n’ stormy) and watch the sun set on the lawn of The New York Yacht Club.  On a side note, I was married here and it is one of my favorite locations.

2. Images 2,3,6, and 7 are various levels of The Clark Cooke House ( the Sky Bar is the top) which in my opinion, is the best restaurant in town for dinner.

4. The Newport Bridge at Sunset

5. The Black Pearl is located right next to the Cooke House on Bannisters Wharf and is the perfect spot for lunch or go to the annex for a hot dog and clam chowder.

7. The Boom Boom Room is the night club in the basement of The Clark Cooke House.

1. and 2. The Elms was the summer residence of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Julius Berwind of Philadelphia and New York. Mr. Berwind made his fortune in the Pennsylvania coal industry. In 1898, the Berwinds engaged Philadelphia architect Horace Trumbauer to design a house modeled after the mid-18th century French chateau d’Asnieres (c.1750) outside Paris. Construction of The Elms was completed in 1901 at a cost reported at approximately $1.4 million. The interiors and furnishings were designed by Allard and Sons of Paris and were the setting for the Berwinds’ collection of Renaissance ceramics, 18th century French and Venetian paintings, and Oriental jades. The elaborate Classical Revival gardens on the grounds were developed between 1907 and 1914. They include terraces displaying marble and bronze sculpture, a park of fine specimen trees and a lavish lower garden featuring marble pavilions, fountains, a sunken garden and carriage house and garage. These gardens were recently restored.

Mrs. Berwind died in 1922, and Mr. Berwind invited his sister, Julia, to become his hostess at his New York and Newport houses. Mr. Berwind died in 1936 and Miss Julia continued to summer at The Elms until her death in 1961, at which time the house and most of its contents were sold at public auction. The Preservation Society of Newport County purchased The Elms in 1962 and opened the house to the public. In 1996, The Elms was designated a National Historic Landmark.

3. The Tea House at Marble House. Marble House was built between 1888 and 1892 for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt, a summer house, or “cottage”, as Newporters called them in remembrance of the modest houses of the early 19th century. But Marble House was much more; it was a social and architectural landmark that set the pace for Newport’s subsequent transformation from a quiet summer colony of wooden houses to the legendary resort of opulent stone palaces.

Mr. Vanderbilt was the grandson of Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, who established the family’s fortune in steamships and the New York Central Railroad. His older brother was Cornelius II, who built The Breakers. Alva Vanderbilt was a leading hostess in Newport society, and envisioned Marble House as her “temple to the arts” in America. It was designed by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The cost of the house was reported in contemporary press accounts to be $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. Upon its completion, Mr. Vanderbilt gave the house to his wife as a 39th birthday present. The Vanderbilts had 3 children: Consuelo, who became the 9th Duchess of Marlborough; William K., Jr., a prominent figure in pioneering the sport of auto racing in America; and Harold, one of the finest yachtsmen of his era who successfully defended the America’s Cup three times. The Vanderbilts divorced in 1895 and Alva married Oliver H.P. Belmont, moving down the street to Belcourt. After his death, she reopened Marble House, and had a Chinese Tea House built on the seaside cliffs, where she hosted rallies for women’s right to vote. She sold the house to Frederick H. Prince in 1932. The Preservation Society acquired the house in 1963 from the Prince estate.  In 2006, Marble House was designated a National Historic Landmark

4. The Breakers is the grandest of Newport’s summer “cottages” and a symbol of the Vanderbilt family’s social and financial preeminence in turn of the century America. Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt (1794-1877) established the family fortune in steamships and later in the New York Central Railroad, which was a pivotal development in the industrial growth of the nation during the late 19th century. The Commodore’s grandson, Cornelius Vanderbilt II, became Chairman and President of the New York Central Railroad system in 1885, and purchased a wooden house called The Breakers in Newport during that same year. In 1893, he commissioned architect Richard Morris Hunt to design a villa to replace the earlier wood-framed house which was destroyed by fire the previous year. Hunt directed an international team of craftsmen and artisans to create a 70 room Italian Renaissance- style palazzo inspired by the 16th century palaces of Genoa and Turin. Allard and Sons of Paris assisted Hunt with furnishings and fixtures, Austro-American sculptor Karl Bitter designed relief sculpture, and Boston architect Ogden Codman decorated the family quarters.

The Vanderbilts had seven children. Their youngest daughter, Gladys, who married Count Laszlo Szechenyi of Hungary, inherited the house on her mother’s death in 1934. An ardent supporter of The Preservation Society of Newport County, she opened The Breakers in 1948 to raise funds for the Society. In 1972, the Preservation Society purchased the house from her heirs. Today, the house is designated a National Historic Landmark.

5. and 6. Doris Duke’s Rough Point. Frederick W. Vanderbilt built this vast English Manorial house in 1889 on a dramatic, windswept promontory on Newport’s Cliff Walk, overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. In 1922, James B. Duke, the founder of fortunes in electric power and tobacco, and benefactor of Duke University, purchased Rough Point. In 1925, James Duke died, leaving his enormous financial legacy to twelve-year-old Doris, his only child. Rough Point became one of Doris’s several very private retreats.

Doris Duke had a keen eye as a collector and followed this passion throughout her life. Representative artists within the collection include Renoir, Van Dyck, and Joshua Reynolds as well as artisans of the Ming Dynasty. Upon her death in 1993, she bequeathed the estate to the Newport Restoration Foundation, the organization she founded to help preserve Newport Rhode Island’s architectural heritage.

7. The Tennis Hall of Fame

Places To Stay:

1. The Inn at Castle Hill overlooks the mouth of Newport Harbor and Jamestown.

To reserve a room: http://www.castlehillinn.com/

2. The Chanler Hotel is perched right above 1st Beach at the beginning of the Cliff Walk.

To reserve a room: http://www.thechanler.com/

3. The Hotel Viking is the perfect spot to be right in the center of town.  From here it is an easy walk to tour the mansions, browse antiques on Spring Street, or walk down to dinner on Thames Street.

To reserve a room: http://www.hotelviking.com/

Real Estate: Below are a selection of beautiful homes that are currently for sale in Newport. Visit  www.liladelman.com or www.gustavewhite.com for details.

If you want to see more of Newport and read about the architects and the people whose homes they designed go to amazon for the following books:

www.amazon.com

xo,

S

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Equestrian Chic

I was referred to this article in Garden & Gun ( don’t you just love the name of this magazine?) by one of my cousins and I had to get this out there.

If you’re looking for an original piece of Kentucky Thoroughbred history, chances are George Gatewood of Longwood Antique Woods has it. Based in Lexington, Gatewood specializes in reclaiming horse barns slated for demolition or no longer in use. But these aren’t just any old horse barns. Gatewood’s collection includes such finds as original stall doors from Faraway Farm, the birthplace of Triple Crown winner War Admiral, and hoof-worn paving bricks from Hamburg Place, the stomping grounds of multiple Kentucky Derby winners since its founding in 1898.

Gatewood’s mission began when he watched a bulldozer barrel through his family’s 200-year-old farmhouse in Mount Sterling, Kentucky, to make room for an industrial park. “It was just awful to watch,” he says. Since then, his team has meticulously pulled some two million nails from 500 structures, preserving wood and other materials that otherwise would have been lost to history.

For do-it-yourselfers, Gatewood will ship the materials directly to you, or his team can also install antique flooring, beams, and mantels, or even create one-of-a-kind furniture. “These barns are not being used,” he says. “They will expire and fall back into the earth. It’s nice to know you can sacrifice those buildings and someone will honor them for a long time to come.”

You can see the magazine and the above article on Garden & Gun’s website: www.gardenandgun.com

Visit the Longwood website and look for everything from salvaged beams, to doors, to log cabins: http://www.longwoodantiquewoods.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2&Itemid=5

xo,

S

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Memorial Day Getaway

In need of a break? Is there weather still a bit too cool for you? Get on Jetsetter and book yourself a vacation at a deep discount!

Hotel Luca- Napa Valley

Perfectly situated in Yountville, this boutique hotel offers you access to their Italian restaurant on site with a complimentary breakfast as well as a spa for that much needed massage after a long day of vineyard hopping. Yountville is also home to a few of my favorite spots: Maisonry, Bouchon, Bistro Jeanty, and French Laundry.

Round Hill- Jamaica

The interiors were designed by Ralph Lauren so you can expect a high end but relaxed vibe. Amazing views of the Caribbean from the restaurant, your room, and the infinity edge pool. You will also get a discount on your jet blue flight!

Fairmont- Southampton, Bermuda

Sink your toes into the warm pink sand f Bermuda’s beaches will sipping a Dark and Stormy. This 100 acre plantation estate boasts an ocean-view golf course, tennis center, and nine restaurants and bars.

El Bulli Hotel – Seville, Spain

Food and wine, a gourmet paradise. The 44 room Andalusian hotel is built around a 1,100-year old farmhouse. Bedrooms boast soaring ceilings with hand painted murals. Stroll among gardens carefully lined with orange trees and Mediterranean herbs, lounge by the pool on a luxurious day bed, or consider a massage in the spa. The hotel is quite but you can make the 25 minute drive into Seville for shopping, museums, and nightlife.

The Osprey- Beaver Creek

Is your idea of a getaway wide open spaces in the wild west? The Osprey is right on the mountain at Beaver Creek allowing their guests access to hiking, biking, fly fishing, golf, etc.

Sign up for free at Jetsetter: http://www.jetsetter.com/sales

Happy Travels.

xo,

S

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